Ag Today

AG Today

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Ag Today Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Ag water battle goes viral [Hanford Sentinel] Seems like everybody is jumping into the red-hot California water debate. Ever since Gov. Jerry Brown announced on April 1 that cities like Hanford and Lemoore would be forced to conserve in a big way to cut the state’s water use by 25 percent, the accusations have been flying, with major non-California blogs, newspapers and pundits jumping into the ring last week and asking whether California agriculture – the largest private source of jobs in Kings County and a $45 billion industry statewide – is sharing the pain. That, in turn, has sent...

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Ag Today Monday, April 13, 2015

Big north-to-south California water sale dries up [Sacramento Bee] When the water supply is tight in California, the product often flows to where the money is. Typically, that means north to south. In the record-breaking drought of 2015, however, practically no one has a drop to spare. That means the buying and selling of water can grind to a halt, even with jaw-dropping prices on the table. That appears to be the case with a mammoth deal engineered by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and a group of Sacramento Valley rice farmers….Now the deal is largely falling apart....

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Ag Today Monday, April 13, 2015

Big north-to-south California water sale dries up [Sacramento Bee] When the water supply is tight in California, the product often flows to where the money is. Typically, that means north to south. In the record-breaking drought of 2015, however, practically no one has a drop to spare. That means the buying and selling of water can grind to a halt, even with jaw-dropping prices on the table. That appears to be the case with a mammoth deal engineered by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and a group of Sacramento Valley rice farmers….Now the deal is largely falling apart....

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Ag Today Monday, April 13, 2015

Big north-to-south California water sale dries up [Sacramento Bee] When the water supply is tight in California, the product often flows to where the money is. Typically, that means north to south. In the record-breaking drought of 2015, however, practically no one has a drop to spare. That means the buying and selling of water can grind to a halt, even with jaw-dropping prices on the table. That appears to be the case with a mammoth deal engineered by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and a group of Sacramento Valley rice farmers….Now the deal is largely falling apart....

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Ag Today Monday, April 13, 2015

Big north-to-south California water sale dries up [Sacramento Bee] When the water supply is tight in California, the product often flows to where the money is. Typically, that means north to south. In the record-breaking drought of 2015, however, practically no one has a drop to spare. That means the buying and selling of water can grind to a halt, even with jaw-dropping prices on the table. That appears to be the case with a mammoth deal engineered by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and a group of Sacramento Valley rice farmers….Now the deal is largely falling apart....

Read More

Ag Today Monday, April 13, 2015

Big north-to-south California water sale dries up [Sacramento Bee] When the water supply is tight in California, the product often flows to where the money is. Typically, that means north to south. In the record-breaking drought of 2015, however, practically no one has a drop to spare. That means the buying and selling of water can grind to a halt, even with jaw-dropping prices on the table. That appears to be the case with a mammoth deal engineered by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and a group of Sacramento Valley rice farmers….Now the deal is largely falling apart....

Read More

Ag Today Monday, April 13, 2015

Big north-to-south California water sale dries up [Sacramento Bee] When the water supply is tight in California, the product often flows to where the money is. Typically, that means north to south. In the record-breaking drought of 2015, however, practically no one has a drop to spare. That means the buying and selling of water can grind to a halt, even with jaw-dropping prices on the table. That appears to be the case with a mammoth deal engineered by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and a group of Sacramento Valley rice farmers….Now the deal is largely falling apart....

Read More

Ag Today Monday, April 13, 2015

Big north-to-south California water sale dries up [Sacramento Bee] When the water supply is tight in California, the product often flows to where the money is. Typically, that means north to south. In the record-breaking drought of 2015, however, practically no one has a drop to spare. That means the buying and selling of water can grind to a halt, even with jaw-dropping prices on the table. That appears to be the case with a mammoth deal engineered by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and a group of Sacramento Valley rice farmers….Now the deal is largely falling apart....

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Ag Today Friday, April 10, 2015

California regulators defend farmers' access to water in drought [Reuters] The administration of California Governor Jerry Brown hit back on Thursday against criticism that its drought conservation mandates apply to consumers but do not include the state's $45 billion agriculture business. Pushback from top water regulators came in response to complaints from environmentalists that agriculture, which accounts for 80 percent of water used by humans in the most populous U.S. state, should also be required to conserve. "Agriculture in California produces the food we all rely on," said Secretary for Natural Resources John Laird at a briefing on the drought...

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Ag Today Friday, April 10, 2015

California regulators defend farmers' access to water in drought [Reuters] The administration of California Governor Jerry Brown hit back on Thursday against criticism that its drought conservation mandates apply to consumers but do not include the state's $45 billion agriculture business. Pushback from top water regulators came in response to complaints from environmentalists that agriculture, which accounts for 80 percent of water used by humans in the most populous U.S. state, should also be required to conserve. "Agriculture in California produces the food we all rely on," said Secretary for Natural Resources John Laird at a briefing on the drought...

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